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Friday’s Favorites: Spiders and Webs

This time of year brings to mind spooky things, and to me the spookiest is running into a spiderweb and wondering if you are wearing the weaver of that web! We have quite a colony of orb weavers in our garden, and I am amazed by the intricacy of these woven wonders.

Ugly Bug Ball, by Christen Brown

The base of this piece is a cotton twill fabric. I pieced and stitched the web using a vintage embroidery ribbon, and rickrack trim. The web holds a host of ‘’ugly bugs’’ stitched mainly from old sewing notions and vintage glass and hand-blown glass beads. This can be seen in my book, Creative Embroidery, Mixing the Old with the New.

Spiders Hide in the Dusk, by Christen Brown

The base of this piece is a cotton batik, that I machine quilted, and then framed with a rayon cord. The embellishments include vintage glass and shell buttons, glass seed and larger beads. The webs, spiders, and button flowers are worked in bead embroidery stitches. This is a project in my book, Beaded Embroidery Stitching.

If you know my work, you know that I sneak a spider and a web into many of my crazy-pieced creations. I am in awe of the beauty of those delicate structures, and I try to capture that beauty either with beads or threads.

Charlotes Webs, by Christen Brown

This project started with the reproduction cigarette silk print in the center, whom I named Charlotte. The center section was crazy-pieced with tiny and tinier pieces of precious silk scraps left over from a few other projects. Satin ribbon was machine stitched randomly to create sections for the vignette embroidery which was worked in silk embroidery ribbon, woven ribbon, perle cotton and beads. Additional embellishments include vintage buttons and glass charms.

As much as I love to look at the webs, I am deathly afraid of real-life spiders! When I embroider the spider, I try to create a more whimsical version to somehow confront my fear! It works, until I run into a web, and then wonder…

All Friday’s Favorites posts.

Thank you for looking, and Happy Stitching to you all! ~Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 7

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Knotted, Woven and Whipped Stitches and Embellishment Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

Knotted, woven and whipped stitches are all unique stitches, that add texture to your embroidery. The embellishment stitches use beads and buttons, and add a touch of whimsy to your projects.

Happy Stitching~ Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 6

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Straight and Outline Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

These two stitch groups are so versatile, and are used throughout the book in conjunction with many of the other individual and continuous stitches.

Happy Stitching~ Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 5

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Cross and Herringbone Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

Today we are going to cover cross and herringbone stitches.

Cross Stitches

These individual stitches can be used as a single stitch, combined to create a border row, or added to another stitch to create a larger component.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and going down at point B to create a straight line. The stitch is completed by coming up at point C and going down at point D, crossing over the previous stitch.

Herringbone Stitches

These continuous stitches can be used for a border row or to create a shape. After the stitch is formed, individual stitches can be added to the tips or around the base to create a larger design.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, forming a straight stitch. The stitch continues with point D, then back to point A. This stitch can also be worked in individual stab motions.

Artists and Samplers

I asked several friends to be involved in the Stitch Along Week posts. I selected 10 stitches and broke them into 5 groups. Each participant chose one group to work with, stitching a sampler or block in any colors or fibers that they wanted to work with.

Allison Aller, Artist, Author, Teacher

Allie Aller has been making quilts in many genres for 50 years, employing her college design education. She has published three books, won many national awards, taught on Craftsy, and appeared on The Quilt Show twice. Visit her blog to see the annual finishes she posts at the end of every calendar year.

You can find Allie here:

Blog: http://alliesinstitches.blogspot.com/. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/allison.aller/. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/alliealler/

19” x 29”

Stitches used in my sampler, left to right

  • Cross stitch, pg 122
  • Woven Cross Stitch, pg 104
  • Herringbone Elongated, (large scale, couched, 2 rows stacked), pg 129
  • Cross stitch, vertical inside the herringbone triangles, pg 123
  • Crossed star stitch, pg 125 alternated with Cross stitch short cross with arrow tip detail, pg 123
  • Magic Cross stitch, pg 124
  • Embroidered floral trim on netting
  • Herringbone Stitch, Netted, pg. 130, capped with a fly stitch
  • Individual cross stitch used to couch down metallic ribbon
  • Cross stitch Short Cross, pg 123
  • Woven trim
  • Cross Stitch Short Cross, pg 123
  • Cross Stitch and French Knots, pg. 123
  • Herringbone stitch, pg 128
  • Floral Tambour stitched trim
  • Herringbone Stitch Laced, pg 132
  • Herringbone stitch, pg 128
  • Herringbone Elongated, pg. 129
  • Woven geometric trim
  • Herringbone Elongated, pg. 129
  • Individual cross stitch used to couch down metallic ribbon
  • Cross stitch, pg 122
  • Herringbone Stitch Boxed, pg 129
  • Embroidered floral trim on netting
  • Herringbone stitch, pg 128 capped with Colonial Knots
  • Cross Stitch Long Arm, pg 123
  • Thorn Stitch, pg 127 one side capped with Colonial Knots
  • Herringbone Elongated, pg 129 (large scale, couched)
  • Individual Cross Stitches in triangular space, pg 122
  • 24 Cross and Fly Stitch Stars, pg 126 with extra cross stitch within each fly stitch

Allie’s Books, from C & T Publishing:

Christine Vinh, Artist, StitchesNQuilts

My journey with fiber has led me to explore new mediums, learn new techniques, and meet many kindred spirits. My goal is to share my love of color, texture and fiber with others, whether through selling my work or sharing stories.

As part of this project, not only did I explore the two possibilities of two stitches but I chose to  try different threads. The cross stitch sampler uses a variety of threads & color ways in the Painter’s Thread collection. And the herringbone sampler was done using an 8 wt Eleganza Thread Pack by WonderFil using a sample of variegated threads.

You can find Chris here:

https://stitchesnquilts.com. https://www.facebook.com/StitchesnQuilts

Stitches used: cross stitch netted, cross stitch row overlaid, cross stitch row netted, thorn stitch, crosshatch, cross stitch doubled 

Painter’s Threads used: Ribbon Floss, Gimpe, Perle Cotton # 5, 8 & 12, Braided metallic, Eye lash silk

Sampler 2

Stitches used: herringbone stitch twisted / repeat, herringbone stitch w/ French knot, herringbone with cross stitch, herringbone double stitch, herringbone with straight stitch details, random filling with overlapping threads

Threads: 8 wt Eleganza Perle cotton from WonderFil

Christen Brown, Artist, Author, Teacher

This small strip-pieced sample can be found in the book. The embroidery stitches were worked in a variety of herringbone and cross stitches, with French knot and straight stitch details. I used perle cotton #8 for all of the embroidery and to stitch the novelty buttons in place.

Hand Embroidery Dictionary by Christen Brown, C&T Publishing

Thank you to each of the participants of the Stitch Along Week! Everyone created a unique piece, that reflects their own style. I am so grateful to each and every one of these artists!

Happy Stitching to you all! ~Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 4

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Fleet and Cretan Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

Today we are going to cover fleet and cretan stitches.

Fleet Stitches

These individual stitches can be used as a single stitch, combined to create a border row, or added to another stitch to create a larger component.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. The stitch would end with a point D.

Cretan Stitches

These continuous stitches can be used for a border row or to create a shape. After the stitch is formed, individual stitches can be added to the tips or around the base to create a larger design.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. Point C becomes point A for the following stitch. The stitch is work continuously and would end at point D.

Artists and Samplers

I asked several friends to be involved in the Stitch Along Week posts. I selected 10 stitches and broke them into 5 groups. Each participant chose one group to work with, stitching a sampler or block in any colors or fibers that they wanted to work with.

Patti Culea, Artist, Author, Teacher, patticuleadolls.com

Being raised on a farm in central Illinois where we had long, cold winters helped me learn many fiber art techniques.  My great grandmothers were my teachers as my grandmothers and my mother were busy in the kitchen, or the barn, or the chicken coops. 

My dad’s grandmother was born and raised in England and she was a master at embroidery, knitting, quilting.  Grandma Davies taught me hand embroidery.  I first started with dish towels embroidering Monday, Wash Day, Tuesday, Ironing, etc.  I moved from those to pillowcases and eventually more detailed items – handkerchiefs and clothing.  My other great grandmother – Grandma Dunnigan – was a wonderful bead artist and she taught me both loom and off loom beading, plus some bead embroidery.

Fast forward to the 1990’s where I first met Christen at a quilt shop in Poway, California.  I took all of her classes on fabric collage and embroidery.  Christen’s embroidery was bright, colorful, more innovative than what I had learned growing up. Being a cloth doll designer and teacher I use a lot of embroidery on my dolls.  After learning the Fleet Stitch from Christen’s book I can’t wait to create a new doll using this stitch.  Thank you Christen for introducing me to this fabulous stitch. 

  • Front: The embroidery stitches were worked in the fleet stitch and cretan stitch overlayed. I also used the Embroidery Stencils, Darling Motif Collection, the dress, scissors, and hanger which are outlined in the fleet stitch. The hexis are outlined in fleet stitch, with a six-petal flower in the center with French knot details.
  • Back from left to right: reverse fleet stitch, cretan stitch overlaid, reverse fleet stitch, cretan stitch with fleet stitch, fleet stitch. The hexi’s were attached with Fleet stitch.

Lynn Woll, Artist, Founder and CEO Create Whimsy

I am a creator. I grew up with our mother always stitching, sewing, knitting, crocheting — or finding projects to keep her hands and her girls busy. Our father was a wood worker and engineer — always tinkering with something. Their influence has led me to a life of stitching, making and building my life in both tangible and intangible ways.

I used the fleet stitch, fleet stitch long arm, fleet stitch offset, snowflake stitch, cretan stitch 4-row, cretan stitch 3-row, and French knot stitches in my sampler.

Christen Brown, Artist, Author, Teacher

I used a variety of fleet and cretan stitches with French knot and straight stitch details. The stitches are worked in perle cotton #8, #12, and #70 tatting cotton. The threads were from Fiber on a Whim, Caron Collection, Presencia, Anchor, and DMC.

Thank you to each of the participants of the Stitch Along Week! Everyone created a unique piece, that reflects their own style. I am so grateful to each and every one of these artists!

Happy Stitching to you all! ~Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 3

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Fly and Feather Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

Today we are going to cover fly and feather stitches.

Fly Stitches

These individual stitches can be used as a single stitch, combined to create a border row, or added to another stitch to create a larger component.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. The stitch would end with a point D.

Feather Stitches

These continuous stitches can be used for a border row or to create a shape. After the stitch is formed, individual stitches can be added to the tips or around the base to create a larger design.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. Point C becomes point A for the following stitch. The stitch is work continuously and would end at point D.

Artists and Samplers

I asked several friends to be involved in the Stitch Along Week posts. I selected 10 stitches and broke them into 5 groups. Each participant chose one group to work with, stitching a sampler or block in any colors or fibers that they wanted to work with.

Susy Boyer, Artist, Teacher

I began creating as a young child. My mother shared her love of embroidery, crocheting, sewing and knitting with me. She put a pre-printed dresser scarf in my hands with needle and floss. All I needed to get going was a Stem stitch, Lazy Daisy and a French Knot. I can spend hours looking at Crazy Quilts and feeling a kinship with the makers. I have a wonderful husband and family, which includes four fabulous grandchildren. Passing on the gift of creating and sharing what I love is a joy of mine.

I used Pearl cotton thread, silk thread, rayon thread with the sparkle in it and wool thread. The wool is the three red roses and the green fly stitch leaves. I also used the alphabet and dragonfly templates from the Embroidery Stencils, Darling Motif Collection.

Nancy Karst, Artist

My Grandma introduced me to embroidery when I was 9. I have been a devoted needlewoman since then.  Though I have dabbled in many textile arts, quilting and embroidery are my favorites. I collect vintage textiles and sometimes incorporate them into my work.

Note: Since I am left-handed, I am thrilled that each the left-hand diagrams get equal space right next to the “righties”. I have tried new (to me) fly and feather variations and will continue to explore more. I also used two stencils from the Darling Motif Collection. The birdhouse used fly and feather stitches, that seemed appropriate. The spiderweb was fun, I know it will make an appearance in my future embroidery work.

Kathy Seaman Shaw, Artist, Author, Teacher

Kathy has six books about crazy quilting techniques available on Amazon. The most recent two, Stunning Stitches and Dazzling Diamonds are also available at C&T Publications. Marking templates to accompany her books are available at Creative Impressions.com. She loves teaching…especially to beginner quilters. Free online courses in various techniques used in crazy quilting are offered on her blog at shawkl.com with registration dates throughout the year.

Thank you to each of the participants of the Stitch Along Week! Everyone created a unique piece, that reflects their own style. I am so grateful to each and every one of these artists!

Happy Stitching to you all! ~Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 2

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Barb and Blanket Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

Today we are going to cover barb and blanket stitches.

Barb Stitches

These individual stitches can be used as a single stitch, combined to create a border row, or added to another stitch to create a larger component.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. The stitch would end with a point D.

Blanket Stitches

These continuous stitches can be used for a border row or to create a shape. After the stitch is formed, individual stitches can be added to the tips or around the base to create a larger design.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. Point C becomes point A for the following stitch. The stitch is work continuously and would end at point D.

Artists and Samplers

I asked several friends to be involved in the Stitch Along Week posts. I selected 10 stitches and broke them into 5 groups. Each participant chose one group to work with, stitching a sampler or block in any colors or fibers that they wanted to work with.

Amy Barret-Daffin, Artist, Publisher at C&T Publishing

I am a serial crafter, I make quilts, embroider, I did jewelry and card making for several years, who knows what’s next?  About 7 years ago, I started embroidering when I was traveling for work, about 50 days per year, and I needed something to do while in transit (I can’t stand working on a plane). I loved the portability of embroidery and combining it with felt. I love the act of embroidering and love the feel of the textiles in my hands.  My stitches were Barb and Blanket, I don’t normally use these stitches so I enjoyed the challenge of doing something new and seeing how it turned out. 

Stitches used were barb stitch, barb stitch angled, crossed wire stitch elongated, blanket stitch, and blanket stitch looped. The French knot and straight stitches were used for decoration. Note: Amy is left-handed and has worked the stitches accordingly.

Chardel Blaine, Artist, Editor of Create Whimsy

Chardel Blaine works with renowned artists and makers who inspire creatives to get their hands busy every day. She teaches hand-stitch classes for Quilt Seminars at Sea and shares more of her fiber art and beaded jewelry at juried art shows in the Pacific Northwest and beyond, as well as on her website Flying Goat Studio. Chardel managed and taught at a local quilt shop and bead store for 15 years, happily succumbing to many of the temptations within.

Barb & Blanket Stitch Sampler

Stitched on linen with size 12 Presencia perle cotton in a 10-inch hoop. Sampler pattern is based on the Star of Texas quilt block, first published in the Ladies Home Journal in 1912. Barb stitches appear inside the “pattern pieces”. Blanket stitches outline the block.

Barb Stitches Used (clockwise, from upper right):

  • Barb Stitch (page 74)
  • Dandelion Stitch, single color (page 78)
  • Tiny Butterfly Stitch (page 78)
  • Barb Stitch Flowers (page 79)
  • Fireworks Stitch (page 78)
  • Barbed Wire Stitch (page 76)
  • Barb Stitch Looped (page 75)
  • Little Fly Stitch (page 78)
  • Center: Santa Fe Star Stitch (page 78)

Blanket Stitches Used (clockwise, from upper right):

  • Blanket Stitch Closed Variation (page 85)
  • Blanket and Stem Stitches (page 88)
  • Blanket Stitch (page 80)
  • Blanket Stitch Closed (page 84)
  • Blanket Mock Sheaf Stitch (page 86)
  • Blanket Stitch Crossed Variation (page 85)
  • Blanket Stitch Angled Variation (page 84)
  • Blanket and Chain Stitch (page 88)

Gailen Runge, Artist, Creative Director of C&T Publishing

As the Creative Director of C&T Publishing, I get to be surrounded by beautiful crafts every day (including Christen’s!). In “real” life, I’m a serial crafter, with my first love of quilting sharing time with garment and bag sewing, knitting, crochet, embroidery, and pysanky egg dying. I love embroidery for the portable nature of the craft — I always take my stitching with me on road trips and to watch my kids’ high school sports. 

When I think of blanket or buttonhole stitches, I think of wool applique, so I made a 5″ butterfly. I had a fun time stitching up this little guy!

Featuring 10 different blanket and barb stitches: blanket stitch whipped, blanket stitch flower, blanket stitch netted, looped petal row, blanket stitch looped zipper, blanket stitch closed, blanket leaf stitch, barb stitch looped, barbed wire stitch, and the little fly stitch.

Thank you to each of the participants of the Stitch Along Week! Everyone created a unique piece, that reflects their own style. I am so grateful to each and every one of these artists!

Happy Stitching to you all! ~Christen

Stitch Along Sampler Week- Day 1

The Hand Embroidery Dictionary/ Lazy Daisy and Chain Stitches

Everything embroidery bundled into one helpful how-to guide! The book breaks down 500+ stitches from the basics for beginners to more complex designs for advanced stitchers.

  • Learn how to choose tools, threads, and embellishments
  • Basic stitch guides explain accurate placement to help you achieve the perfect stitch
  • Each stitch includes a stitched sample, instructions and in most cases illustrations
  • Learn how to change the position of the stitch and use the distance between points to change the look of the stitch
  • Tips and instructions for left-handed embroiderers

There are 16 groups of stitches which include straight, outline, knotted, woven, and whipped, lazy daisy, chain, barb, blanket and buttonhole, fly, feather, fleet, cretan, cross, herringbone, capped, chevron, and embellishment stitches.

Today we are going to cover lazy daisy and chain stitches.

Lazy Daisy Stitches

These individual stitches can be used as a single stitch, combined to create a border row, or added to another stitch to create a larger component.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. The stitch would end with a point D.

Chain Stitches

These continuous stitches can be used for a border row or to create a shape. After the stitch is formed, individual stitches can be added to the tips or around the base to create a larger design.

The basic stitch is formed by coming up at point A and then, in one motion, going down at point B and coming up at point C, which catches the loop formed by points A and B. Point C becomes point A for the following stitch. The stitch is work continuously and would end at point D.

Artists and Samplers

I asked several friends to be involved in the Stitch Along Week posts. I selected 10 stitches and broke them into 5 groups. Each participant chose one group to work with, stitching a sampler or block in any colors or fibers that they wanted to work with.

Liz Aneloski, Artist, Author, Editor C&T Publishing

In my work life, I’m an editor at C&T Publishing, so I’m always surrounded by creativity. I love to stitch; quilting, embroidery . . . whatever.  I’m happiest when I have a needle and thread in my hand. I took on Christen’s sampler challenge to make Garden Gate and enjoyed every minute. 

I used the following stitches:

  • Lazy daisy stitch: page 60
  • Iris stitch: page 64
  • Russian chain stitch: page 63
  • Chain stitch: page 67
  • Chain stitch whipped: page 67
  • Chain stitch spiny: page 69
  • Chain stitch twisted: page 69
  • Chain stitch open tip: page 68
  • Running stitch: page 49
  • French knot stitch: page 54

Judy Gula, Artist, Artistic Artifacts

I am a mixed media fiber artist and creator of Artistic Artifacts. My sample was created using Artistic Artifacts Indian Hand dyed cotton and WonderFil #8 pearl cotton.

Stitches used were:

  • Top: Lazy daisy with bullion tip stitch, lazy daisy with bullion, lazy daisy with French knot stitch, lazy daisy side by side, bumblebee stitch
  • Right: lazy daisy, lazy daisy stitch offset base, lazy daisy with pistil stitch, chain stitch
  • Bottom: Lazy daisy double, berry stitch, lazy daisy stitch crossed, 3-petal lazy daisy stitch flower, dragonfly stitch
  • Left: Lazy daisy stitch twisted base, lazy daisy square tip base, lazy daisy plaited stitch, lazy daisy heart stitch

Christen Brown, Artist, Author, Teacher

I used a variety of lazy daisy and chain stitches with French knot stitches for details. The cotton sampler is framed in a 6” embroidery hoop. The stitches are worked in perle cotton #8, #12, and #70 tatting cotton. The threads were from Fiber on a Whim, Caron Collection, Presencia, Anchor, and DMC.

Thank you to each of the participants of the Stitch Along Week! Everyone created a unique piece, that reflects their own style. I am so grateful to each and every one of these artists!

Happy Stitching to you all! ~Christen

Day 23 of FLOWERS GALORE!

Day 23 of FLOWERS GALORE!

Raised and Textured Embroidery Sampler

This is a sampler of raised and textured stitches which include whip-stitch rose and variations, spiderweb rose, petite twisted rose, bullion stitch, bullion posy, cast-on buttonhole stitch, buttonhole rose, tatted stitch, tatted posy, spiral tatted stitch, tatted rose, Chinese knot stitch, and Christen’s shisha mirror stitch. These stitches and more can be found in my book Embroidered and Embellished by C&T Publishing.

Happy Stitching, enjoy~ Christen!